Health Information Week – join in!

Many organisations across different sectors are collaborating for Health Information Week (HIW) (3-9thJuly 2017). This campaign aims to improve accessibility of high quality health information for the public as well as building on local partnerships between information providers and improving health literacy.

How can you get involved? You could put up a health information display in your school or find out what is happening locally – you could have a stand at a health event being organised near you or offer internet searching tutorials. Many more ideas are listed here and you can ask for local contacts. Please let sarah.greening@hee.nhs.uk know what you are planning so that your display or event can be added to the diary and promoted. You can also promote the HIW campaign to staff and students via newsletters and social media (#HIW2017)

For more information and to access HIW resources:http://learning.wm.hee.nhs.uk/health-information or contact: sarah.greening@hee.nhs.uk

The Twitter campaign has started and can be followed via #HIW2017; there is also a thunderclap which anyone is encouraged to support (it just means that an automated HIW tweet will be sent at once from every twitter account that signs up before 3rd July). Support the HIW thunderclap:thndr.me/n5h7SW

It would be great to have some school libraries joining with this – as it is end of term and almost the summer holidays, perhaps some health information promotion about travel health, sun care and mental health resources like Mood Boosting books etc for reading over the holiday?

Do consider joining in with this – contact your local NHS librarian for any leaflets that you may want for your own school display.

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Eltham event – part two!

SLG Regional Event.  Saturday 18th March 2017.  Held at Eltham College, London.

Due to popular demand Eltham College was the impressive venue once again for one of the SLG Regional Events.  Having offered the same programme back in October and being highly oversubscribed, Caroline Roche, Librarian and Chair of the SLG, decided to organise a second chance to access the programme. She  offered a highly informative programme of speakers and topics where school librarians could meet and share good practice.

Caroline opened the proceedings with the SLG News update as Chair.  Being one of the strongest advocates of not only schools having libraries but those libraries having a dedicated librarian, her passion for these issues was clear to all.  It soon became very apparent that the others in the room collectively felt the same way.

The presentation ‘Using technology for teaching and learning’, also delivered by Caroline, was extremely well received. Many tools were showcased including Diigo, Animoto and MySimpleShow gave us the information and confidence to go and try these in our own setting. Whilst Caroline readily admitted some of the things she demonstrated were far from new, they still have a place within the sector to aid both staff and students.

Our next speaker was Maggie Thomas, Librarian at Bacon’s College in South London.  Maggie spoke to us of her experience in ‘Rebuilding the library presence.’ This was a very personal story of how Maggie reorganised and rejuvenated her library space so the pupils and herself benefited enormously, however we could all identify with some aspects that we as school librarians face on a daily basis. Maggie now runs a highly successful library and is constantly evaluating the service she offers.

Then came Murder by the Book’. Alex Gillespie of Box Clever Education demonstrated how we could all hold a murder in the library…hypothetically of course!  We entered the library to find the outline of a body and a series of clues laid out for us to solve the mystery. Well…….what a competitive lot we are!  Clues were gathered quickly and the red herrings were identified.  The big reveal was after lunch so we retired for some well-earned refreshments.

During lunch there was time to catch up with colleagues we may not have seen for a while or indeed meet new ones! There was a definite buzz in the room as the morning’s activities were discussed as well as sharing success stories of our libraries. After lunch the murderer was identified although I am not going to disclose who that is…….you never know who reads this!

Matt Imrie, Librarian at Farringtons School, was next on stage and he gave a fascinating talk on Library freeconomics – or getting free stuff for your library.’ With budgets being an emotive topic, we were all keen to see how we can still bring new resources into school with the investment of our time rather than our money!  Needless to say I am sure we will all be entering lots of competitions because as Matt so rightly said ‘You have to be in it to win it!’

Our final presentation of the day was by Rowena Seabrook, Human Rights Education Manager at Amnesty International UK‘Using fiction to highlight human rights issues.’, led us to work together in small groups looking at human rights and how we can promote them in our school through our literary choices. Using a variety of resources, we touched upon many of the challenges facing different people today.  This as you can imagine triggered a lot of discussion and debate. This presentation was very timely given the publication of the CILIP Carnegie Medal shortlist and this too was broached by Rowena as some of the content of some titles is very sensitive and needs careful thought before lending to some students.

The day ended with lots of email addresses exchanged and the promise of keeping in touch.  I am sure I speak for all of the delegates when I say a huge Thank You to Caroline not only for hosting such a rewarding day but also for her tireless energy in the promotion of both school libraries and of course school librarians!

By Julie Angel.  Assistant Librarian, Eltham College

 

Posted in Advocacy, CPD, Leadership, Libraries, Regional Training Days, School Libraries, Training and CPD | Leave a comment

A word about Copyright

Naomi Korn, a CILIP Trustee, came to speak at the Day Conference and AGM on February 7th 2017 for SLG.  Having heard her speak at CILIP Conference 2016, I knew she was excellent and an authority on  copyright.  She runs her own copyright agency, and has a gift for explaining difficult concepts really simply for us.  Naomi didn’t disappoint, giving us a really clear understanding of how copyright works in practice and answered some questions.  However, there just wasn’t time for everything to be answered, and so Naomi kindly wrote up her talk, and included lots of great links for us, on her own blog here.  Do have a read, and bookmark the page, as I guarantee that this is something we shall all  need to visit and revisit again.  Our thanks to Naomi for her time and generosity in helping us with this difficult subject.

 

Posted in CILIP, Copyright, digital literacy, School Libraries, Teaching and Learning | Leave a comment

Reading Outcomes Framework

The Reading Agency has published its long-awaited Reading Outcomes Framework. This tool is designed to ‘help improve impact evaluation across the sector…..It will help you understand, demonstrate and improve the impact of your activity to encourage reading. It will support you to make the case for investment and advocate for your work by outlining existing evidence about the outcomes of reading and providing guidance about collecting evidence about the impact your work makes.’ (Laura Venning, Reading Agency, Evaluation and Impact Research Manager). It is freely available to use across education, health and charities sectors. The toolkit is the end of the first phase and the Reading Agency asks anyone using it to give them feedback.

It includes a succinct one page framework of the outcomes of reading for pleasure and empowerment, sample survey questions which evaluate whether a project has impact on these outcomes and reference evidence about demonstrating how reading relates to these outcomes. The report and evaluation toolkit form a solid 72 pages, but it is well worth reading through it.
I have been interested in impact evaluation for a couple of years now and have developed some templates for Tower Hamlets SLS. This toolkit is a most valuable addition to the subject. Measuring reading for pleasure is notoriously difficult and potentially mainly anecdotal and subjective. This toolkit could contribute to producing measurable outcomes that can be used as advocacy.

The framework outlines four stages of analysis of a reading project from the ‘activity to encourage reading for pleasure and empowerment’ to potential reading impact outcomes. These may have a positive impact on health and wellbeing, intellectual outcomes, personal outcomes and social outcomes. These in turn lead to wider positive impact on cultural, economic and societal areas.
The survey questions are very detailed and are broadly similar to the ones used by the National Literacy Trust to evaluate their projects with children, such as Premier League Reading Stars and also The Reading Agency’s Chatterbooks book clubs . I have used this questionnaire myself with primary school children and, with guidance, it produces useful information and, if used before and after the project, potentially provides useful impact evaluation data. To be of greater value though you need to assess the continued impact some time later. The survey can also be used with other stakeholders.

The most interesting sections for me are the analysis tools and the references. As someone with no statistical background, I will be studying these to improve my skills.

Full details and links to the framework, the toolkit and an interactive version are at: https://readingagency.org.uk/news/blog/reading-outcomes-framework-toolkit.html

Lucy Chambers, SLG National Committee

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Revalidation – why bother?

Post written by Sheila Compton, who is on the SLG National Committee

When looking on the CILIP Directory of Registered Practitioners to see if my Revalidation had been updated I noticed that coincidentally the Revalidation was registered exactly 41 years after I originally registered as a Chartered Librarian. This led me to reflect on what had driven me to undertake revalidation at this stage in my career, when I am clearly not on an upward trajectory in the job market! Soon after I became a Chartered member, ALA, the profession became all graduate entry. Although the status of those who had achieved Chartership under the old system was preserved I later decided to update my qualifications by obtaining a degree. I felt that this would enhance my skills to the level of younger professional colleagues; and would also put me academically on a par with teachers, as I had eventually settled on a career in school librarianship.

My degree involved a lot of reflection on my own practice through action research, which gave me many opportunities to develop my skills. Over the years I had attend training events and conferences to keep myself up to date so I could just have left it there; quite frankly at this stage in my career why bother with revalidation? Looking at the profession with its dwindling numbers of professional school librarians, and having no desire to change jobs, there did not seem a lot to motivate me to revalidate. After all, surely it would take ages to evidence and require extra work?

Like many people I started in a half-hearted way to keep a record of my CPD and thinking it would have to be evidenced through formal conferences and training sessions, with certificates of attendance to validate my presence. Months later I had not really got very far with it, and almost gave up until a flash of inspiration made me put down revalidating as my performance management personal target at school. This I felt would achieve two aims as I would have evidence of professional development for school, and it would actually make me finish my revalidation. There was also a slight hidden agenda as in my capacity as SLG Vice Chair I wanted to show librarian colleagues that revalidation is achievable at any age and stage in your career, and perhaps to encourage others to do the same. I think that it is important to be able to evidence our continuing professional development both from the point of view both of our own integrity and to ensure our viability in the job market.

The SLG 2016 Conference “Read all about it” spurred me on to actually get on with the whole revalidation process as I attended the seminar, led by Matthew Wheeler of CILIP, on Professional Registration which included Revalidation. In his presentation Matthew explained the process and showed that for Revalidation the key elements were the logging of CPD and a reflective statement. It soon became evident that the tasks were less onerous that I had thought. Professional reading counted as an activity, as did attendance at courses and even participation in committee meetings. By the end of the year I realized that I had well exceeded the minimum requirement of 20 hours without any excessive financial cost, or demands upon my time.

The final task was the reflective statement, the hardest part of which was encapsulating my reflection on all of the CPD in 250 words. With the CPD log and the reflective statement uploaded to the CILIP VLE the process was finished in December, and in January I was thrilled to receive confirmation from CILIP that my Revalidation had been accepted.

So why had I done it? I wanted to prove that it was an achievable target, and to be able to show my line manager and the Head that I was still keeping up with professional development. I had achieved my personal targets, developed my professional practice, and realized how much CPD can be done in a multitude of different ways. I hope that maybe I will be able to encourage my fellow librarians to revalidate too; it is not difficult, and there is a real feeling of achievement when you get the congratulatory email from CILIP.

Sheila Compton BA (Hons) MCLIP Revalidated 2016

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Providing Excellent Library Provision

logo2By Alison Tarrant, MCLIP, MSc Econ Honour List Librarian, School Librarian of the Year Award 2016

Cambourne Village College is in its fourth year. We opened in September 2013 with a single year group, and have been building up year by year. Starting from scratch really enabled those running the school to think about what was needed – and a school library was definitely part of the plan. I was appointed as Librarian in the Easter term of 2013, which allowed me to plan an excellent library service.

Among some there is a misconception that the library is just a room full of books, and the Librarian someone who stamps them. Though the most visible aspect of the job, this is not excellent library service, and definitely doesn’t reflect the role of Librarian. At the core of excellent school library provision are two things: Information Literacy and Reading Development. These provide the fundamental helix which enables everything else.

empty-library

Information Literacy

Information Literacy (IL) is the ability to find, use and communicate information in an ethical manner,(1) and is often widened to include research skills – such as note taking and evaluating outcomes. It is teaching pupils the skills they need to maximise the opportunities the internet provides, while exercising criticism. As Librarian, I create worksheets that guide students through the research process we use. (2)  I introduce this to all Year 7 classes at the start of the school year, and recap with other years as necessary. I lead sessions to introduce specific skills when required. I collaborate with teachers to provide resources that provide scaffolding for students, while allowing them freedom, and I produce videos that guide students through resources or skills as reminders for homework. I create Research Starter booklets for any topics where it is harder to find information at the right level – using short excerpts from higher level texts allows students access to the information without its being overwhelming. This creates a platform from which students can conduct their own research; once they have a foundation of knowledge they can access other information more easily, both in terms of understanding (3) and validity.

Reading Development

The Library stands astride a difficult gulf – supporting reading for pleasure while simultaneously ensuring pupils are progressing in their reading skills. Those who literally cannot read will probably fall under an intervention department, but there are plenty of students who fill the spectrum between ‘able to read’ and ‘fully fluent independent reader’. (4)  At the most basic level, the Librarian’s job is to make this development easier by encouraging students to read, by connecting books (including e-books) and readers. Calling this ‘basic’ is not to underestimate its importance. There are pupils in CamVC who only read now because two years ago they found a book they loved – this can have long-lasting and potentially life-changing impact. Not all students will want to read, and I take a further step in trying to identify these students. ‘Attitude to Reading’ surveys given at the beginning of the year help us recognise those ‘reluctant readers’, while comparing the results to their reading ability allows us to identify different groups (‘can but won’t’; ‘can’t but will’ etc). This leads to intervention interviews with the students in question: What is it that is preventing this child from wanting to read? Is it a family matter? A self-consciousness? Do they struggle with idioms and contexts? Are they simply not used to it? It is only by talking to the students that we can get to the core of the issue and start to target the cause, rather than the symptoms. Of course we will not be successful with everyone, but sometimes having the conversation is more important than the outcome – the fact that someone cares can make a difference to a child.

Reading is important – it provides opportunities to experience someone else’s life decisions, and unveils the wider world in all its complexity, helping students understand themselves and each other better – and I am here to discuss this all with them. “Miss, what’s a hermaphrodite?”; “What do you think about the death penalty?”; “Why does this book have rude words in?” The journey of discovery is not complete without someone they can turn to and ask the questions that have been raised in their minds. The Librarian extends learning and guides curiosity – “Ah, you liked that one? Try this,” or places a book in the hands of someone who needs it (a book with an LGBTQ character for someone who is questioning their sexuality perhaps) because they will not ask for it, but it might be the most important book they will ever read.

Progression

For the first two years, the focus was on embedding the double helix – setting up the Patron of Reading scheme and ensuring library lessons were fully utilised with an activity to develop reading skills in each session. At the same time the library started to develop an atmosphere – warm, inviting and engaging. Each school library represents a school in the same way the daemons in Philip Pullman’s ‘The Northern Lights’ represent each character’s personality, and the library was starting to capture the best of the staff and school surrounding it. In the early days the library was empty, with far too few books (building the collection year by year is the only way that makes sense – allowing that flexibility to respond to changing curricula and students) and yet now the shelves are overflowing. We now have e-book lending set up and a few different e-resources to help students with their research. For us it is a combination of formats and information – not one versus the other. Books, e-books and the internet are all tools that are useful in different ways and for different things; part of my job is ensuring the students can select the appropriate one and use it to its full advantage.

The role of Librarian has developed as well, from the days of cataloguing and setting up the Library management system, whereas now it is more focused on the library being a whole school resource – including contributing to teaching. I am uniquely placed in having an overall view of what is being taught and when, so I created a curriculum map. Compiling this information is invaluable for realising opportunities for collaboration between teachers, and showing progression of knowledge. It gives me an opportunity to make sure my resources are up to date, and that any opportunities for research skills or reading lists are utilised. My knowledge of what is going on within the school makes teamwork with colleagues easier, and creates opportunities for collaboration between different members of staff. For some Librarians, using this knowledge means they can develop additional learning opportunities – whether this be through interactive videos, creative projects, or any other talents your Librarian has.

I contribute to the school at a strategic level. Attending Middle Leader meetings means I know the pressures and deadlines that exist within the school and enables me to provide assistance and contribute, for example, with suggestions for the school’s development plan. Given the central role the library plays in school life, this 360 degree view allows me to make sure the library is aligned with the school’s aims over the next year or so. Access to the development plan is essential for any library which functions as a department within the school, and ensures that the school is getting the most from its investment. It answers the fundamental question: Where is the library contributing to the school’s aims? My Library’s development plan is broad. It covers reading ages, inclusion, staff CPD, working with feeder primaries – and these are marked off against the annual report, showing the impact and value of the library and librarian.

It is only through being respected as a professional (5) in my own right that this excellent library service has been achieved. I am incredibly well supported by the Senior Leaders, with a sensible budget and access to CPD. (6) As the Library has developed, the role of a Library Assistant has become a necessity, and we are planning a long-term vision for library provision, laying out the core aims and priorities of the library. There are very few definite things in education, but research has shown that libraries that have this support, impact on student outcomes (7) regardless of economic status. Providing an excellent library service is far more than stamping books: it is varied, important and has a positive impact on both staff and students.

[1] Learning Resources in Schools, Library Association Guidelines for School Libraries (1992).
[2] http://loc.gov/teachers/tps/quarterly/inquiry_learning/pdf/StriplingModelofInquiry.pdf
[3] Hirsch, E.D. ‘Why Knowledge Matters’, Harvard Education Press, 2016. P.83
[4] For more information on the different stages of reading CLPE have created a brilliant diagram that explains the fluid stages: https://www.clpe.org.uk/library-and-resources/reading-and-writing-scales
[5] I am a Chartered Librarian, and as a member of CILIP I adhere to the code of professional practice. For more information on chartering for librarians see: http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/jobs-careers/professional-registration/information-employers
[6] The School Library Association runs brilliant courses: http://www.sla.org.uk/training.php
[7] http://www.rgu.ac.uk/research/research-home/research-at-aberdeen-business-school/news/impact-of-school-libraries-on-learning/

As first published in Leading Change – The journal of the Leading Edge network.

 

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Reading Rocks event, October 2016

From time to time, SLG is asked to send representatives to different events around the country to speak or to set up a stand.  This involved us getting involved with a stand in the ATL Conference earlier in the year, being represented and giving a talk to a Headteachers’ Teachmeet in the summer, and the Reading Rocks event this autumn.  Lucy Chambers from the committee attended this event, and wrote her report for us.  Every meeting we attend is a chance for us to interact with people we wouldn’t normally reach, and to spread the word about the great things school libraries are doing.

Lucy writes: ‘I attended the first one day Reading Rocks 2016 conference, established to ‘discuss ways to make reading rock for every pupil.’  near Warrington, to deliver a workshop on behalf of SLG.  This was an opportunity to speak at an event aimed at teachers rather than just librarians and is something the committee has been discussing for some time: how to cross the invisible barrier and promote the impact librarians can have on a school to educationalists.

The District CE Primary School in Newton-le-Willows has won awards for its approach to reading and has many inspirational reading areas, from several small libraries within the school to a Story Shack, a book-themed playground and a Little Library of books for parents.   They promote reading with stylish and interactive displays and regular reading events throughout the year.

My role was to advocate the value of school librarians, in this case in primary schools, and to promote SLG.  I also spoke about how I use regular Reading Year events to get children reading in my four schools in Tower Hamlets.  The day was devoted to literacy sessions of interest to primary school teachers, with several authors and promoters of reading schemes. Keynote speakers included James Clements, the founder of Shakespeare and More, who works with schools to develop the teaching of reading, and Mat Tobin, Senior Lecturer in English and Children’s Literature at Oxford Brookes’ School of Education, talking about the hidden messages in picture books , including a thought-provoking interpretation of ‘Not Now Bernard’, elicited with discussion from Year 1 to Year 6 pupils.

Workshops ranged from sessions promoting First News, Phoenix and other magazines to a project using rhythm and music to improve reading comprehension in low ability children. Other workshops included storyteller Dan Worsely, Into Film, Mat Tobin, Jonny Duddle and Nikki Heath.

Altogether, it was a very impressive event with some excellent speakers, a great range of exhibitors and an ambitious programme.  If you are a primary school librarian or teacher, look out for Reading Rocks 2017 and sign up!’

See the school’s website www.district.st-helens.sch.uk/ for further information

 

Posted in Advocacy, CILIP, Literary Events, Networking, Reading for Pleasure, School Libraries | Leave a comment

SLG Regional Conference: Oakham School

Julie Angel, Assistant Librarian at Eltham College, attended our conference at Oakham School on November 1st 2016, and sent us her report of the day:

The SLG Regional Conference was held at Oakham School and hosted by Darryl Toerien, Head of Library and Information Services at the school.

The first speaker the day was David Harrow, the Academic Deputy Head, who talked about how the school library was at the centre of teaching and learning and the impact it had on students and their outcomes Post 18. Backed by research and the statistics that generated, I think we all felt valued and appreciated as our hard work and input does genuinely make a difference.  He told the group: “… even when the aims of the curriculum are considered in this most utilitarian fashion, properly staffed and resourced libraries are highly successful in developing the required qualities and outcomes. However, the progressive interpretation, where the aim is for students to acquire both knowledge and mastery of the processes of learning more for themselves, as well as engendering ongoing wellbeing, is also dramatically evidenced by the same studies as being strongly supported by libraries. The place of the school library at the centre of teaching and learning can, therefore, be established beyond doubt.” This is a strong statement in support of libraries, echoing the supportive statement from the deputy head in the previous report from the Regional Conference at Eltham College.

Next was Karen Benoy, Librarian from The Thomas Alleyne Academy, who shared with us her experience of using data to track reading in KS3. She is a very strong advocate of not only collecting the data, but then using it in planning and organising the strategies to raise reading levels and how this can lead to the rise in achievement across the curriculum. Using effective intervention, personal to the pupils, Karen showed how her initiative has led to improved results in reading for the pupils in her school.

Clare Scothern from Trent College followed with her account of the ‘Read to Succeed’ week she held in school last year. Clare told of the experience in a very honest way, highlighting the successes of the week but also the negatives and her reflection on how she would change things next time. This was reassuring to hear that with even the best laid plans sometimes things do not always go the way we anticipated!

Our host was the next to speak on the subject of ‘Curriculum Mapping’ and its importance in the daily running of the library. Darryl spoke of the significance of working with Heads of Departments and looking at their schemes of work to ensure the pupils had access to resources that would not only support their studies but also to extend their knowledge of the subject in question. It is very evident he is passionate about this aspect of his role and how he can create cross-curricular themes giving teaching staff an insight into how colleagues are helping students to get the best possible outcomes.

Before lunch Sheila Compton, from the SLG National Committee gave us a news update on where the group in now, how she would like to see it develop and how we can play a part in the group. From her presentation it is clear the SLG within CILIP is a very active sub-group offering support and guidance to school librarians across the country.

During lunch there was time to discuss the morning’s topics with colleagues both old and new whilst browsing in the school library. We then were given access to the school’s online resources where we could look at what is on offer for those who were less familiar with these materials.

Once back in the auditorium it was the turn of Sophie Fisher from Stephen Perse Foundation, Cambridge to deliver a session on the ‘Diversity in Picture Books’. Sophie brought with her a range of resources for us to look at and digest whilst also giving a plethora of information on the subject of diversity in books in general. This led to a group discussion on how we each promote these books within our own libraries with many ideas being voiced.

Our penultimate session was delivered by the Assistant Librarian at The Leys in Cambridge. Lyndsey Goddard gave a humorous but very observational insight into changing sectors within the profession. Her tales of being an academic librarian in a university and the transition into schools had us all laughing out loud at the experiences she has had in both. A second career may be in the pipeline!

To end a superb day of CPD, Allison Tarrant from Cambourne Village College gave us food for thought while presenting ‘Assessing the impact of an information literacy programme.’ Questionnaires for Y9 on their understanding of IL, as well as having a logo on work to prompt students to understand that research is required, are just a couple of ways Allison assesses and promotes the lifelong IL skills needed in today’s educational climate.

May I take this opportunity to thank Darryl and Oakham School for their hospitality and allowing us to meet in such a wonderful venue. I certainly learnt a lot from the day and talking to other delegates during my time there, they too found the day highly thought provoking and as always the chance to share good practice is invaluable to us all.

Posted in Regional Training Days, School Libraries, Training and CPD | 1 Comment

SLG Regional Event in Kent/SE London

CILIPSLG held one of its very successful Regional Training Days at Eltham College in South East London on October 24th.  The day was heavily over-subscribed, and there are plans to rerun the day next March for all those who were disappointed this time.  Like all of the training days, there was an eclectic mix of subjects, and everyone found something to interest them in the day.

The first speaker was Caroline Roche, who also hosted us in her Library at Eltham College.  Caroline also runs Heart of the School website. She talked about using technology to help the learners in your school, and EPQ students in particular.  She showcased Diigo, MySimpleShow and Animoto, and gave out practical How To worksheets after her talk.

Next came Matt Imrie from Farrington’s School.  Matt runs the very successful Teen Librarian newsletter and website.  Matt talked to us about Freenocomics – how to get stuff for your library for free, and how to encourage your students to blog about books.

Last speaker before lunch was Maggie Thomas from Bacon’s College.  Maggie told us about a radical refurbishment of her library which involved her in strategic thinking and planning, including a review of how she should be line managed.  She had amazing support from her Line Manager throughout the successful process.

During lunch there was a great opportunity to network, and also to play the newly published Murder in the Library from BoxClever Education.  Alex Gillespie, an English teacher who devised the game, set it out in Eltham College Library, and we were all encouraged to find out who had murdered the Library Assistant!  This was an excellent game involving deductive thinking and reasoning skills.  There are many levels to the game, and is suitable for all abilities.  Everyone enjoyed it and quite a few people bought copies for their libraries.

In the afternoon Rowena Seabrook from Amnesty International spoke to us about Human Rights issues in Teen Fiction.  Her talk was thought provoking, both in how to promote and how to protect human rights of the students in the school.  There was a lot of productive discussion around LGBTQ rights and fiction, and also representation of teenagers of all races and colours in your library stock.  We all had a lot to think about after her talk.

CILIPSLG tweeted throughout the day, and a Storify of the tweets can be found here.

CILIPSLG Regional events are held throughout the year in different parts of the country.  If you are interested in attending one of our low cost events then keep an eye on this page.  If you are interested in hosting a meeting in your school, please contact SLG through their pages on the CILIP website.

 

 

Posted in Advocacy, CILIP, CPD, digital literacy, ICT, Leadership, Libraries, Library Skills, Networking, Reading for Pleasure, Regional Training Days, School Libraries, Social Media, Teaching and Learning, Training and CPD | Leave a comment

Good news!

Good news!  The London and South East group have allowed the CILIPSLG National Committee to also add resources to this site, so from now on you will be able to hear about news and events from all over the country.  Thanks to London and South East for allowing us to widen the scope of their already brilliant blog!

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